OXFORDSHIRE NATURE CONSERVATION FORUM

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Hedgerows

The hedgerow habitat generally resembles woodland edge and scrub, occurring in a linear form. As well as being important habitats in themselves, hedges provide links between other habitats, such as woods and ponds, forming a network across country, along which it is thought wildlife can travel. The most important hedges for wildlife are those with the most diverse habitats, which in general means the most species-rich hedges, but which also includes structural diversity, which is particularly important for birds. Diversity can arise in a number of ways, but usually the most species-rich hedges are also the most ancient; these now have some measure of protection under the Hedgerow Regulations 1997.

Hedgerows are especially important for butterflies and moths, farmland birds, bats and small mammals.

Some species which will benefit from this HAP

Mammals
Bats
Birds
Barn owl
Yellowhammer
Linnet
 
Whitethroat
Partridge
Insects
Black Hairstreak butterfly
Brown Hairstreak butterfly

 


Other Open Habitat Action Plans
Chalk and Limeston Grassland Farmland Grazing Marshes and Neutral Grasslands Heathland
 
Other Habitat Task Forces
Settlements Earth Heritage Wetland Woodlands




Other Habitat Task Forces
Open Settlements Wetlands Woodlands