OXFORDSHIRE NATURE CONSERVATION FORUM

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Heathland

Heathland is formed when forests on nutrient poor soils are cleared and then managed by grazing, burning and/or gathering of heather and gorse use as fuel and thatch. It is not only an important habitat for wildlife but is also a valuable part of our cultural heritage.

Lowland heath is characterised by species such as heather, bell heather, and gorse, and it is associated with acidic, nutrient-poor soils. Heathland is a very rare but nevertheless important habitat in Oxfordshire. It has a very localised distribution with the largest remaining areas in the Frilford area west of Oxford (Midvale Ridge Natural Area) and on the Chilterns plateau.

Some species which will benefit from this HAP

Birds
Nightjar
Tree pipit
Reptiles
Adder

Insects
Dingy Mocha moth
Grey scalloped bar moth
White-line snout moth
Emperor moth

Plants
Broad-leaved cudweed
Blue fescue
Heath cudweed
Heather
Bell heather
Cross-leaved heath
Sphagnum mosses

 


Other Open Habitat Action Plans
Chalk and Limeston Grassland Farmland Grazing Marshes and Neutral Grasslands Hedgerows
 
Other Habitat Task Forces
Settlements Earth Heritage Wetland Woodlands

Other Habitat Task Forces
Open Settlements Wetlands Woodlands